Author Archives: Roland_Keates

The witchcraft trials in Finnmark

When we think of witch trials, we tend to think of Salem witch trials first and foremost. Yet in Finnmark, 135 people were accused of witchcraft in the 1600’s. The majarity of these cases took place in Vardø, and Vadsø. Read more

Street Art

None political street art in Belfast

The murals, street art, frescoes of Belfast are a sight to see even if you can’t decide on what to call them. These public artworks go far beyond Catholic and Protestant areas. With a convulsive history like few others, the centre of Belfast is decorated profusely with creative and imaginative street art. Some would call it graffiti; for me, this is street art at its best. Read more

Beaghmore Neolithic settlements

Beaghmore, Neolithic settlement in Northern Ireland, is considered one of the largest in the country. The Neolithic village has stone circles, cairns, standing stones, stone rows, and a henge. This site is one of the largest and most crucial stone circle complexes in Northern Ireland. Read more

Greek mythology story of Narcissus

This blog was inspired by David McNeil poem about Greek mythology of Narcissus. I wanted to know more about the Greek mythology story and how this is very appropriate to many in today’s society. Read more

Samuel Plimsoll and the development of vessel Load Line legislation

Samuel Plimsoll and the development of vessel Load Line legislation.

Have you ever looked at a ship hull and wondered what the lines were called? David McNeil a retired merchant seaman can answer this question

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Plato

Ecology in Ancient Greece

Before beginning my research on ancient environmentalists, I wondered who actually invented the term Ecology? As you know I love to research and found out it was in 1866 when German biologist Ernst von Heckel used the term Ecology and wrote it in the book of Generelle Morphologie der Organismen. He applied the term oekologie to the “relation of the animal both to its organic as well as its inorganic environment.” The word comes from the Greek oikos, meaning “household,” “home,” or “place to live.”, as stated in the encyclopaedia Britannica.

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Gretna Green the history of anvil weddings.

Gretna Green Wedding History

My wife and I have been married for over 17 years so visiting Gretna Green blacksmith smithy on the way up to Scotland for our holiday could be construed as a little too late, but what the heck, a toilet stop was needed. Read more

Paul Cézanne, Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses

National Gallery March Day One visit

Upon a recent visit to the National Gallery in London, I was in awe of the paintings on the walls and with the horde of people passing through, one could understand why it is one of the most visited galleries in London and an absolute must for visitors to the English capital.

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Phyllida Barlow Sculpture

Phyllida Barlow

Since the late 1960’s, British artist Phyllida Barlow has developed a practice that is grounded in an anti monumental tradition. Her often brightly coloured sculptures are made of readily available materials such as cardboard, cement and plaster, polystyrene, timber and paint. These inexpensive materials are then transformed through layering, accumulation and careful combination to create large scale pieces. Read more

Thomas J Price sculpture

Thomas J Price

Thomas J Price practice takes a variety of forms, from sculpted heads and figures to stop motion animation. His sculptures are amalgamation of a wide range of influences, including ideas taken from classical sculpture, observations of people, and images from magazines. “Network” is one such sculpture. Read more

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