Transfigure Photography ethos is to find the converging line between the world of film, fine art and commercial photography and bound all those agents together to cook up a dream and add it to a reality. I work with an idea, visualise it and create it. Transfigure Photography says as much about me than the name denotes. I have metamorphosed myself from a snapshot photographer to a professional photographer, photographing many different subjects, from seascapes, portraiture, to monster dump trucks.

Photography for me is walking hand in hand with film making, converging the demand for creative exploration and pushing the boundaries in liberating client’s realities to give their photo shoot a new perspective digitally.


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Boris Mikhailov

Boris Mikhailov

I recently visited Vienna, and one of the museums I had to visit was the Albertina Museum (August 2016). Why…. Boris Mikhailov, a Ukrainian maverick photographer had a few photographs I had wanted to see, these photographs intrigued me because they showed a Russia which the iron curtain had not wanted the world to see.

Russia wanted to portray an ideology to the world, as the clean living nation, Milkhailov did not portray this image, quite completely the opposite. This is some what quite refreshing, yet, in another way, was Mikhailov posing his subjects to gain an audience? This question is left the reader to determine.

Boris

Boris Mikhailov (Ukrainian, born 1938) Untitled, from the series Case History 1997-98

Boris

Boris Mikhailov (Ukrainian, born 1938) Untitled, from the series Case History 1997-98

Yet the most controversial of his photographs are his “At Dusk” series of photographs.

At Dusk 1993 Boris MikhailovAt Dusk 1993 Boris Mikhailov

At Dusk 1993 Boris Mikhailov

At Dusk 1993 Boris Mikhailov

At Dusk 1993 Boris Mikhailov

At Dusk 1993 Boris Mikhailov

“At Dusk” series of photographs show highlights of political upheaval, history and memories as its subjects. Confronting us with everyday scenes from his native Kharkov, Mikhailov captures the social changes of the Ukraine after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

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Exhibition room at Albertina, Vienna for the exhibition space of Boris Mikhailov

The characteristic blue colour of the photographs achieved by toning the negative, corresponds to the blue hour, which the light is not full daylight, nor full darkness, Mikhailov had wrote this is the “hour when he found himself and his family being evacuated to the Urals during the War.” [1].

 

[1] Mikhailov, Boris 2001 “Mikhailov (Phaidon 55)” Phaidon Press Ltd pp. 127

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